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Ice cream for Christmas?

We may think that people don’t like eating ice cream in the winter months or at Christmas, however we all love to have ice cream as an accompaniment to our Christmas Pudding or Mince Pies and now there are some amazing ice creams flavours that can be eaten on their own or with another dessert.

So if you thought ice cream was strictly for summer, think again, our creative ice cream makers from across the UK are creating delicious and indulgent ice cream with seasonal twists, giving your normal Christmas desserts a run for their money.

Without a doubt, rich, creamy, smooth ice cream is a wonderful thing to have as a dessert in even the coldest weather and is a must at Christmas time and if you want some inspiration or to try something new then this Christmas Cake Ice Cream recipe is for you.

Christmas Cake Ice Cream Recipe

If you make a Christmas cake every year then you will have started your mixture and the soaking of your fruits about now. It takes forever, however, a lot of people still love the process of making a Christmas Cake each year. Once you’ve made your Christmas Cake you then have the job of icing it and making it look pretty. Did you know there is a Christmas Cake Ice cream that takes away all the preparation time and hours of hard work of making an actual Christmas Cake and you can whip it together in just over an hour? The Christmas Cake Ice Cream gives you the delicious taste of a Christmas Cake in a cool, smooth, sweet creamy texture. Try it on its own or as an accompaniment to another dessert, you never know it may become your favourite flavour and not just at Christmas.

Ingredients

375ml whole milk
100g soft brown light sugar
3 egg yolks
185ml heavy whipping cream (36% fat)
1tbsp brandy
175g Christmas cake, diced

Method

  1. Combine the milk and half the sugar in a (not aluminium) pan and bring to just below boiling point. Remove from the heat, cover and leave aside. In a heatproof bowl, combine the yolks with the remaining sugar and beat until pale and thick. Bring the milk back to boiling point, then pour it slowly in a thin stream on to the egg yolks and sugar, whisking steadily as you go.
  2. Place the bowl over a pan of simmering water and stir frequently using a non-metallic spoon. As it heats over the water, the custard will thicken. This can take anything from 5-30 minutes. On no account let it overheat or boil as it will curdle.
  3. As soon as the custard has thickened sufficiently, remove the pan from the heat and plunge the base into a few inches of cold water. Leave to cool, then cover and chill in the fridge. When it is cold, stir the chilled cream into the custard and add the brandy.
  4. To still-freeze, pour into a strong polypropylene container and cover and put in the freezer. Check after about an hour that the mixture has a firm ring of ice around the sides and base and a soft slush in the centre. Then either beat for a few seconds with a hand beater or quickly process in a food processor until it has formed a uniform slush, and return back to the freezer. Repeat this process at least twice at intervals of 60-90 minutes. After the third beating, the ice will need freezing for a further 30-60 minutes.
  5. When it’s ready, sprinkle on the diced cake and stir or churn briefly to ensure even distribution. Serve within 1 hour if frozen solid; allow 30 minutes in the fridge to soften sufficiently before serving.

(Ingredients and Recipe sourced from the Independent)